Stitch Fix Outfits 2018
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Stitch Fix Outfits 2018

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Stitch Fix Outfits 2018

When you have made the mistake of knitting a purled stitch or purling a knit stitch (or even dropped a stitch), work over to that point in the work directly above where the mistake has been made and drop this stitch from your needle and down to the point of the mistake. Turn your work, if necessary, to have the knitted side of that same stitch facing you. Then, using a crochet hook, reach in with the hook and pull each successive step of the ladder thus made through the loop on the hook, one at a time. Pull the bottom loop through from the back toward the front, being careful not to twist the loop.

When an error has been made and you must rip back by taking the knitting off the needles, I find it easier for the pick-up to use a smaller size needle than you have originally used. The point of the smaller needle helps slip into the stitches much more easily than the larger needle.

However, when pulling out work in knitting, pull back to the row above the one you wish to pick up; then put your needle into the stitch below the exposed loop, purlwise, holding the thread in your left hand. Pull the thread out of each stitch gently as you pick up the one underneath it. Thus the stitches are on the needle in the correct position for working the next row, and none are lost or dropped. But if one stitch should slip or drop, put your needle into this stitch knitwise, right where it is. On the next row, the fact that the stitch is twisted on the needle will indicate that something is wrong at this point, and you can correct the error at this point.

Another common error in home knitting is casting on your stitches too tightly. If you have this particular problem, you can cut off the whole cast-on row or snip one stitch and pull a thread about two rows back from the edge. Tie in yarn, and, using a crochet hook, make one row of very loose slip-stitch in crochet, catching every loop of the knitted edge.

If a stockinette stitch sweater is too short from the armhole to the ribbing at the waist, open the side seams of the sweater and pull a thread through across the entire piece of work (back and front) two rows above the ribbed border, cutting off the ribbing from the main part of the garment. To do this, snip one little stitch near the edge of the work at the seam and pull the yarn gently, but firmly just as you would pull a thread in a piece of material. Pick up stitches at the bottom edge of stockinette stitches on one needle and the stitches at the top of the ribbing on another needle, holding the ribbing portion in reserve. Attach your yarn to the top piece and work as much stockinette stitch as desired for the altered length. Join this portion to the ribbing with a kitchener stitch.

Please note that any pattern stitch sweater may be shortened by this procedure. No pattern-stitch sweater may be successfully lengthened, as all the stitches will be half a stitch off the pattern.

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